APA

African Press Association
False prophecies reign supreme in Nigeria

Virus spread proves Nigerian prophecies false

from RUSSELL ADADEVOH in Accra, Ghana
ACCRA – THE emergence of the fatal coronavirus (COVID-19) has cast into doubt the authenticity of the so-called prophesies by flamboyant Nigerian pastors.

There are questions over their proclamations of 2020 to be a year of blessings.

A number of these religious leaders proclaimed the year 2020 as a year of “perfection”, “breaking limits”, “series of joys.”

One pastor also proclaimed it “the year of rest.”

Far from it, the COVID-19 has turned the year into one of bloodshed, agony and panic as the virus that broke out in China decimates populations globally and has spilled into Africa.

In total, more than 3 800 people have died from almost 110 000 cases.

“The first three months of 2020 have, however, painted an alarmingly different picture to the declarations quoted above,” Ghanaian analyst, Tawia Acheampong, said.

“The outbreak of the deadly disease – which has even infiltrated Nigeria – is just one of the events shaping 2020 that was surprisingly missed by almost all the 2020 prophecies which flooded social media in the opening days of January.”

Acheampong noted that despite the so-called prophets proclaiming bliss, political upheavals, natural disasters or the demise of public figures were commonplace in prophetic forecasts.

“However, the outbreak of the disease that has stoked worldwide fears and caused a massive economic backlash was strangely missing,” he said.

Nigeria is home to some of the richest pastors in Africa.

These church leaders, mostly dismissed as fake prophets, have courted controversy for living lavishly, allegedly at the expense of their followers.

They are worth millions.

Some prophets in Nigeria and parts of Africa own the latest private jets and run television networks.

– CAJ News